All posts tagged: #rome

Lost Beauty

“Many eyes go through the meadow, but few see the flowers in it.” (Ralph Waldo Emerson) I am writing this post on my flight from Rome to Helsinki. While being in Rome, I was pondering about beauty, maybe as Jep Gambardella in Paolo Sorrentino’s film La Grande Bellezza. We have many values which construct our ”directions” in our lives. One likes driving a car, another ”travelling” every day by feet; in a same way, for one lying is a natural part of his everyday life, for another lying is the last choice and a sign of ”state of emergency”. These many values from gratitude to faith are creating personal moral paths. One of the most interesting and captivating realities is that each person has his own understanding for example of hope, faith, love and wisdom. Beauty is also an inseparable part of our self-awareness and consciousness. All this sounds very nice but in reality there are some tricky aspects in our understanding of the beauty. Our social systems and media give us very often, I could …

In Search of Lost Beauty

Paolo Sorrentino’s La Grande Bellezza is a poem about human being’s spiritual evolution and a meditation about solitude of the exceptional people. Russian poet Fyodor Tyutchev has stated a long time ago that Russia can not be understood rationally and grasped with the mind. I have to reject the poet’s privilegy given to Russia by saying that also Italy and especially the film The Great Beauty directed by Paolo Sorrentino can not be understood rationally as well. Even at the 71st annual Golden Globe awards Sorrentino confessed firmly and shortly that Italia is a crazy but a beautiful country. In many circumstances identified as a new La Dolce Vita, Sorrentino’s masterpiece continues, without any doubt, the Italian cinematographic tradition of the 19th century, the tradition of Italian directors such as Fellini, Rossellini, Antonioni, Scola and Blasetti to name a few, and their visions of “universes” with strong emotions, gaps of life and absurdic tension of love and death. Only one truth is incontestable – each person, each spectator finds own truth, his or her own …